Pricing is fundamental, and you need to carefully consider price points to ensure you can deliver the service but still make a profit. Brand and online reputation will play into this, of course, but most of us are not Apple — so you might be able to pull off being 10 percent more expensive than a competitor if your product is right, but push too hard on the pricing and you will typically lose work.
We’re going to slightly modify their approach, though. The Bullseye Framework is an excellent tool for finding certain channels to try for your product, but it’s also useful for running experiments within a certain channel. For now, you want to stay focused on your stack, so you can use the Bullseye Framework to run certain experiments within those skills.

One of the fastest-growing subsets of digital marketing is Product Marketing and Management. Companies are increasingly looking at hiring managers with a specialization in product marketing and this program from Northwestern | Kellog School of Management does justice in preparing you for those roles. Some of the topics covered in the program include strategizing, analyzing opportunities, defining requirements, designing business models, managing growth and partner ecosystem to name a few.

Since then, many readers, students and not, have reached out and asked about how they can learn digital marketing. It’s a field that’s been ravaged by spammy information and bad ebooks, and it’s difficult to know where to start and what’s worth learning. I’ve been giving out some form of this advice for the last two years, so I figured it would make sense to organize it and provide it here, for anyone motivated enough to follow it.
×