For marketers trying to compete in this new digital medium, it’s incredibly difficult to surface your content above the competitive noise. While the amount of time consumers spend on web and mobile has increased dramatically, the amount of available content has increased exponentially. More digital content is created in a day than most people can consume in a year. With so many distractions and choices, your audience has a very short attention span.
That third step is where the research comes in. For each of the areas you’re trying to improve at, you want to find experiments you can run with that skill in order to get better at it. To find those experiments, look for case studies. Don’t read guides or listicles if you can help it; case studies will be more informative. You want to see specifically what worked for someone else, then turn that into your own experiment you can test.
Since then, many readers, students and not, have reached out and asked about how they can learn digital marketing. It’s a field that’s been ravaged by spammy information and bad ebooks, and it’s difficult to know where to start and what’s worth learning. I’ve been giving out some form of this advice for the last two years, so I figured it would make sense to organize it and provide it here, for anyone motivated enough to follow it.
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