For that reason, you're probably less likely to focus on ‘leads' in their traditional sense, and more likely to focus on building an accelerated buyer's journey, from the moment someone lands on your website, to the moment that they make a purchase. This will often mean your product features in your content higher up in the marketing funnel than it might for a B2B business, and you might need to use stronger calls-to-action (CTAs).


Digital Marketing is an arena with many grey areas between theoretical best practices and practical outcomes. However, it allows you to try your own ideas without blindly following other leaders’ opinions. This is why it is important to try your hand at multiple disciplines like Content Marketing, Social Media, PPC, SEO, Email Marketing, etc. and be accountable for the success or failure of a project. 
People aren’t just watching cat videos and posting selfies on social media these days. Many rely on social networks to discover, research, and educate themselves about a brand before engaging with that organization. For marketers, it’s not enough to just post on your Facebook and Twitter accounts. You must also weave social elements into every aspect of your marketing and create more peer-to-peer sharing opportunities. The more your audience wants to engage with your content, the more likely it is that they will want to share it. This ultimately leads to them becoming a customer. And as an added bonus, they will hopefully influence their friends to become customers, too.
Since then, many readers, students and not, have reached out and asked about how they can learn digital marketing. It’s a field that’s been ravaged by spammy information and bad ebooks, and it’s difficult to know where to start and what’s worth learning. I’ve been giving out some form of this advice for the last two years, so I figured it would make sense to organize it and provide it here, for anyone motivated enough to follow it.
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